100 Words, 100 Days: Day 12. On Disrespect.

I was called a ‘twat’ last evening in work, by someone who smiled while he said it. I didn’t deserve it, and even if I did, name-calling is the last resort of the powerless. It shows a remarkable lack of respect.

The gentleman in question had his bag taken away, accidentally, by a very drunk Scotsman (is there any other kind?). He called me a twat for allowing it to happen while he was outside smoking.

Listen pal, I’m not here to babysit your bags, okay? That’s your job, sunshine. It’s not my fault your medication was in it.

Aargh!

 

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5 responses to “100 Words, 100 Days: Day 12. On Disrespect.

  1. The Kadampa Meditation Center in Florida presents classes on Finding Freedom through Inner Balance:

    It is easy to develop an exaggerated concern for the comforts of this life, such as possessions, respect, pleasure, praise and a good reputation. Often our pursuit of respect, praise, and admiration creates anxiety, stress and frustration. We feel over excited when we have them and dejected or discouraged when we lose them.

    If our love for our friends is mixed with strong attachment it will be conditional upon their behaving in ways that please us, and, as soon as they do something we disapprove of, our liking for them may turn to anger.

    Och, mon, who ye callin’ a drunken Scot? 😉

  2. > If our love for our friends is mixed with
    > strong attachment it will be conditional
    > upon their behaving in ways that please us,
    > and, as soon as they do something we
    > disapprove of, our liking for them may turn to anger.

    Not as quickly as our tolerance of non-friends turns to anger when _they_ do something of which we disapprove.

    The sentence I quoted is obviously from the school of stating-the-bleedin’-obvious.

    All liking ‘may’ turn to anger when sufficiently undermined by the behaviour of they, or that, which is liked. Those in whom we have no emotional investment can rarely do anything which causes us to become angry, unless they interfere with some third-party in which we do have an emotional investment.

    • Excellent point ~ the most common objects of our anger are often our friends, not our enemies or strangers!

      Of course, there are exceptions to every rule. 😀

  3. Your wide-mouthed customer is still busy blaming his woes on whoever he can, as long as it’s not himself.

    His observation could usefully be reflected back at him.

  4. I’d have given him such a punch on the nose!

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