Tag Archives: Organizations

100 Days, 100 Words: Day 31. On Facebook Friends.

I love my Facebook friends. They understand me better, I think. As most of them are writers, bloggers, artists, and experts in their own fields, I get a sense of community that far outweighs the one I have at home. This in no way demeans the one-to-one relationships I cherish in the so-called real world; these are as vital to me as food and water. It’s just that the world of Facebook offers me a place where I can truly be myself, without recrimination. If you understand what I’m saying then it’s possible you feel the same way. Or not.

 

100 Words, 100 Days: Day 27. On Not Having Regrets.

Yesterday afternoon a defiant and sturdy Dublin hurling team gave as good as they got to the reigning All-Ireland Hurling champions, the Premier County, Tipperary.

Unheralded at the start of the season, Dublin took the Nation League title, beating Tipp along the way. But the Championship is meat and drink to all GAA players. Reaching their first final since 1948, Dublin came out with all guns blazing but lost a hard-fought match by four points.

They have the pleasure of looking each other in the eye in the dressing room, knowing they gave it their all. They can have no regrets.

On This Day…30 September

Thursday, 30 September

Say goodbye to September, people. It takes its annual holiday from today and won’t be with us again for another 11 months.

Get prepared for October, back from its own 11 month sabbatical. I’d love a break like that. I need one.

Anyway, on with the show – and today we start with events on this day in…

1399 – Henry IV is proclaimed King of England. Nice one, Hal. It’s a nice job if you can keep hold of it.

1791 – The Magic Flute, the last opera composed by Mozart, receives its premiere performance at Freihaus-Theater auf der Wieden in Vienna, Austria.

1888 – Jack the Ripper kills his third and fourth victims, Elizabeth Stride and Catherine Eddowes.

Hubert Cecil Booth, the inventor of the vacuum cleaner1901 – Hubert Cecil Booth patents the vacuum cleaner. Hoover wasn’t happy that Booth got there before he did.

1935 – The Hoover (oh, a connection at last) Dam, astride the border between the U.S. states of Arizona and Nevada, is dedicated.

1947 – The World Series, featuring the New York Yankees and the Brooklyn Dodgers, is televised for the first time.

1955 – Film icon James Dean dies in a road accident aged 24.

That's a lot of calamari.

1967 – BBC Radio 1 is launched and Tony Blackburn presents its first show; the BBC’s other national radio stations also adopt numeric names.

1982 – Cyanide-laced Tylenol kills six people in the Chicago area. Seven are killed in all.

2004 – The first images of a live giant squid in its natural habitat are taken 600 miles south of Tokyo.

Birthday greetings to:

When A Child is Born singer Johnny Mathis is 75.

Ray Burke, disgraced Irish minister and convicted tax cheat, is 67. The rest of the criminals in the Dail should have gone in with him.

Ex-minister Ray Burke. Boo! Hiss!

On another Irish political note, ex-minister for finance, Charlie McCreevy is 62.

Fran Drescher, American actress and the owner of one of the most annoying voices in entertainment, is 53.

Martina Hingis, Swiss tennis player and former World No. 1, is 30.

Cecelia Ahern, author of PS: I Love You, is 29.

In honour of James Dean, who died today in 1955 (as mentioned above), here’s a scene from his celebrated role in Rebel Without A Cause.

On This Day…27 September

Monday, 27 October 2010

Happy Monday, friends, readers and fellow bloggers. Before I head into matters in hand, I wish to congratulate the Dublin Ladies GAA Football team in winning the All-Ireland Ladies Senior Football Championship. The Jackies gave Tyrone a right trouncing in Croke Park. Well done, girls.

So, this week we begin with events on this day in…

1540 – The Society of Jesus (the Jesuits) receives its charter from Pope Paul III.

1590 – Keeping with things papal, Pope Urban VII dies 13 days after being chosen as the Pope, making his reign the shortest papacy in history. He plainly didn’t fancy the job.

1777 – Lancaster, Pennsylvania is the capital of the United States, for one day. It plainly didn’t fancy the job, either.

It's self-explanatory, really. (Image: posterx.net)

1821 – Mexico gains its independence from Spain.

1854 – The steamship SS Arctic sinks with 300 people on board. This marks the first great disaster in the Atlantic Ocean.

1905 – The physics journal Annalen der Physik published Albert Einstein’s paper “Does the Inertia of a Body Depend Upon Its Energy Content?”, introducing the equation E=mc². Decades later, the rock group Big Audio Dynamite attempted to explain it by song. The tune was good; the explanation rubbish. (It’s actually a homage to the films of director Nicolas Roeg.)

1928 – The Republic of China is recognised by the United States.

1964 – The Warren Commission releases its report, concluding that Lee Harvey Oswald, acting alone, assassinated President John F. Kennedy. Oliver Stone begs to differ.

1995 – The Government of the United States unveils the first of its redesigned bank notes with the $100 bill featuring a larger portrait of Benjamin Franklin slightly off-centre.

1998 – Google is founded. YAHOO!!

Birthdays today include:

Bill O’Herlihy, RTE sports presenter, is 72. The boys of Apres Match do a great impression of him.

Meat Loaf is an edible 63.

Brian Mullins, for Dublin GAA football star is 56.

Irvine Welsh, author of Trainspotting, is 52.

Gwyneth Paltrow, Oscar-winning (WTF?) actress, is 38.

Pint-sized rock-chick, Avril Lavigne, is 26.