Category Archives: Uncategorized

The 25 Best Websites for Music Lovers

Because I’ve recently started learning the guitar, I am all over anything to do with music.

Flavorwire

A couple of weeks back, we published a pretty extensive list of great websites for literature lovers. The feature generated lots of feedback and comment from our readers, so much so that we thought we’d repeat the exercise for music. There are the obvious music sites that everyone reads — Pitchfork, Stereogum, Spin, Resident Advisor (if you’re into electronic music), etc. But there are a galaxy of other sites out there, so here are our favorites: 25 of the sites you may not be reading already, but probably should be. There are loads more, of course, so let us know what you’ve got bookmarked, too.

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The Darwin Murders

A short time ago, I was invited by a friend to write a short piece for an upcoming anthology, published online, called The Darwin Murders. Participants were asked to write a 250 word piece in which they could kill of a character of their choosing, provided the poor unfortunate didn’t/doesn’t exist in real life. (No killing Hitler or Stalin, okay?)

I choose the bane of modern-day small screen viewing, the horror that is the television licence inspector. The editors liked my story so much that I was one of two authors who had their pieces put aside for special mention.

Image

If you want to find out how and why I murdered a television licence inspector, pop over to Amazon and see for yourself. And don’t stop at me, either. Other writers in the anthology harbour secret desires to bump off their nemeses. At the end of the day, we each have our dark sides.

Don’t forget to look behind you – you could be next.

 

100 Little Things Worth Being Happy About

Thought Catalog

1. Your favorite t-shirt.

2. Your favorite show’s newest season being on Netflix.

3. Your favorite coffee in the morning.

4. Looking out the window while riding the train.

5. Watching a Disney movie.

6. A cold shower on a hot day.

7. Being able to inspire yourself.

8. The feeling you get when you relax your shoulders and realize how tense you were.

9. Fresh flowers and candles in your apartment.

10. Lazy Sundays.

11. Planning a trip.

12. Taking a day off work.

13. A nap when you really need one.

14. Receiving a letter in the mail.

15. Finding something you love on sale.

16. City lights on the street after it rained.

17. Checking things off your to-do list.

18. Your favorite song coming on the radio.

19. Feeling comfortable with someone.

20. Going out to dinner with someone you love.

21. Painting.

22. A fire…

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Required reading, my friends, required reading.

Successify!

This article is from Chiara Fucarino. Enjoy!

Disclaimer: This article is not intended to address those with clinical depression or other mental illnesses.

happinessThere are two types of people in the world: those who choose to be happy, and those who choose to be unhappy. Contrary to popular belief, happiness doesn’t come from fame, fortune, other people, or material possessions. Rather, it comes from within. The richest person in the world could be miserable while a person living in the slums of a third world country could be happy and content. I have spent plenty of time amongst both groups to have seen it first hand. Happy people are happy because they make themselves happy. They maintain a positive outlook on life and remain at peace with themselves.

The question is: how do they do that?

It’s quite simple. Happy people have good habits that enhance their lives. They do…

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Reading Challenge 2013

classics2013As anyone who knows me will tell you, I love reading. There are few genres, few authors that I wouldn’t at least consider (except the current craze for soft-core “Mommy Porn”), and my personal bookshelves are testament to this. But I haven’t for a very long time read what is considered a “classic” in the, um, classical sense. So when this challenge popped up in my email this evening, I was handed an ideal opportunity to do something about this.

The blog, Sarah Reads Too Much, offers readers a challenge. Nothing too dangerous, nothing too fancy, but a challenge nonetheless. Participants have a full calendar year to read a minimum of six classic novels, with an option of a further five. There is a prize on offer for those who go most if not all the way. Click on the link for more details.

I haven’t decided yet what books I will read, but these are the categories on offer:

The Required Categories:
  1. A 19th Century Classic
  2. A 20th Century Classic
  3. A Pre-18th or 18th Century Classic
  4. A Classic that relates to the African-American Experience – This can be an African-American author, or a book relating to slavery, civil rights, or African-American culture.
  5. A Classic Adventure
  6. A Classic that prominently features an Animal – This can feature animal characters or animals in the title (real or imagined)
Optional Categories:
   A.  Re-read a Classic
   B.  A Russian Classic
   C.  A Classic Non-Fiction title
   D.  A Classic Children’s/Young Adult title
   E.  Classic Short Stories – collection must include at least 3 short stories by the same author
The only comment I will make at this juncture is that I’m a little bit scared of reading anything Russian. Does anyone know of a short Russian novel?
Who else is in with me?

Our latest Choose Or Die chapter is up, written by Matthew C. Plourde.

life, life and everything in between

What does this all mean? What shall I do?

HINT #1: your Monday just went from blah to much better!

HINT #2: go read the latest chapter of the Ecopocalypse adventure by Matt and vote on the next move:

http://chooseordie.blogspot.fi/2012/09/ecopocalypse-ch5-home-sweet-lab.html

-LFJ 😉

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I need to locate a decent copy of ‘The Count of Monte Cristo’.

thethingaboutflying

Mark Twain famously said that a classic is a book everyone wants to have read, but no one wants to read. As an English teacher, I’ve been given sort of a front row seat to Mr. Twain’s assessment being played out in real life. Most of my students (and, come to that, most people I know) want to be “well-read,” whatever it is, exactly, that means. They cannot, however, seem to put down their copies of The Hunger Games long enough to manage the task. And listen, I’m not cruel; I want people to have fun with what they read (even if it’s assigned reading), but there’s no way to get from point A to point B on the well-read road map without, you know, actually reading a wide range of books, including a fair share of so-called classics. So how to accomplish the daunting task of tackling a representative sampling…

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